A magnificent and historic trip to Sydney

Travel Oceania Add comments

Hyde Park Barracks Museum por sanjoseweb.

A tour of the major Australian city of Sydney, leads among its emblematic buildings, ports and beaches. This blog will talk about excursions and city tours.

The Hyde Park Barracks in Sydney, is a building in the early nineteenth century functioned as a dormitory for prisoners sent from England at that time the convicts are not watching them both. Sample collections of shackles and whips, explains how the drawer where they kept the more rebellious for weeks or months, but insists that prisoners generally moved freely through the fields today cleared the ultramodern downtown area of Sydney. “In fact, the jail was across Australia”.

The history of modern Australia begins nearby, with more than 200 years ago, is one of the many ports that now monopolize the southern edge of Sydney Harbour. Interestingly, the Circular Quay (Circular Quay, also known as Sydney Harbour) is both the most ancient and most modern in the main city in Australia.
Harbour Bridge: This bridge is located on Sydney Harbour, is connected to the center with residential and commercial coastal city. Another place is the opera, surprised both at home and abroad. From the huge windows, shows a giant glass eyes blackened, several boats are seeking refuge from an impending storm that has darkened the day. The interior of the building are undergoing remodeling, but paradoxically, the idea is to restore the look you should have an original project.

Harbour

The history of this magnificent building is also a story of frustration. That end of the spring was a waste when in 1957 the government of New South Wales (the state whose capital is Sydney) opened a competition for the construction of a building for an opera house. The winner was an unknown Danish architect, Joern Utzon, whose resume only totaled a few awards in architecture in Copenhagen. His simple sketches, in some cases little more than a few hurried lines in pencil, were of an ambition that was ahead of his time architecture. But the truth is that neither Utzon engineers or project managers knew exactly how to build cement casings that mimic a giant candles.

Crossing the pier to the other side of the Opera, ten minutes walk leading from the nineteenth century. On the cliffs that rise to the other side of the Port of Sydney is The Rocks (the zone where the first Europeans settled) and its colonial air. Alleys as the Cambridge Street with its old brick townhouses mixed with wooden planks and iron balconies, and the sheer Argyle Stairs, stairs carved by convicts in between the rocks are the remains of the pioneers of the world. The area is especially attractive in the evening, when from their streets suddenly appear dark lights of downtown Sydney or is a reflection of the Opera in the calm waters of the bay.

historic trip to Sydney

The Rocks has its criminal legends and ghost stories, but the oldest of them is about a night out and goes back to the first British convicts night spent in the vicinity of Port Jackson (then known as Sydney Harbour .)

They say a storm broke out and the prisoners took refuge in the caves and crannies of the cliff then call The Rocks. But when the storm intensified and began to lightning and winds are still common in Sydney, inmates improvised a party and drank until dawn. Whether true or not, the oldest and most picturesque pubs of the city remain open today in The Rocks. They are known as hotels, because they drink besides food and lodging, and between the pins are the Hero of Waterloo, with his old piano, raw stone interior wooden bar, or the Lord Nelson, where they make their own beer In view of the customer. A stroll through The Rocks can win with a walk along George Street, known as “the oldest street in the Pacific”.

Return … A magnificent and historic trip to Sydney – Part II

Related posts:

  1. The beautiful city of Sydney
  2. The Sydney Opera House
  3. Sedona: 5 views indispensable on your trip to Arizona

Leave a Reply

*

Rural Lodging - Sitemap.xml
Entries RSS Comments RSS Acceder